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Healing from infant trauma: listening to my baby self

Do you want to be free? Do you want to overcome PTSD? In healing from pre-verbal trauma, unconscious material is allowed into consciousness. Breath habits are treasures of information, especially patterns of holding. Each day for a short time, I sit quietly, following my breathing and listening. Frightening emotions often emerge that have no basis in present reality. This material becomes a teacher. Becoming aware of old fears, guilt, regret, terror, panic, numbness, repression, sadness, hopelessness and rage is often scary and difficult but essential to growth. Awareness brings healing. I feel compassion for myself, especially for that baby – me – that suffered so much. I begin to comfort her (me).  Here are some tips in doing this inner work:

1. Take it step by small step.

2. Be patient. Give yourself all the time that you need.

3. Trust. There are moments that you may not even recognize yourself after letting go of some of this unconscious material.

4. Listen deeply –  beneath the noise.

5. Accept that each sitting presents different challenges.

6. Give in to the help that nature offers – trees, sky, clouds, flowers, water, fresh air. Help is all around.

7. Take frequent breaks.

8. Thank yourself for doing the work.

9. Discuss this process with a trusted friend.

10. Be very gentle with yourself and reward yourself by doing things that make you happy.

This psychological work takes courage and initially, a therapist’s help may be
instrumental. In any case, we can heal from early trauma. We can free ourselves.

0 Responses to Healing from infant trauma: listening to my baby self

  1. Thank you for this information, so useful for anyone who experienced infant trauma and for others who are struggling with PTSD. Your work goes beyond your targeted audience and will help others, including me. I’m sure I experienced trauma in being in an incubator for two weeks, a newborn who may not have been held or rocked or talked to, because those were the Skinner days, keep baby safe and in a sterilized environment. I’m sure I was held once I came home, but as a twin with a mother who was surely overwhelmed with lack of sleep and two crying infants, it likely was not enough contact.

    This is far reaching work. Thank you.

  2. Thank you for this information, so useful for anyone who experienced infant trauma and for others who are struggling with PTSD. Your work goes beyond your targeted audience and will help others, including me. I’m sure I experienced trauma in being in an incubator for two weeks, a newborn who may not have been held or rocked or talked to, because those were the Skinner days, keep baby safe and in a sterilized environment. I’m sure I was held once I came home, but as a twin with a mother who was surely overwhelmed with lack of sleep and two crying infants, it likely was not enough contact.

    This is far reaching work. Thank you.

  3. In my view, you are my target audience. Anyone who experienced early trauma, especially pre-verbal, and anyone who has PTSD and is struggling to cope. Yes, early on I was looking for other survivors of infant surgery, but I’ve since broadened my idea of who I’d like to reach. Your early situation sounds so hard. It was way before the time of the more people-friendly isolettes where family can reach in through openings and touch the baby. Of course, this situation is not ideal either. Thank you for your comment, Irene. Knowing you and your story gives me courage.

  4. In my view, you are my target audience. Anyone who experienced early trauma, especially pre-verbal, and anyone who has PTSD and is struggling to cope. Yes, early on I was looking for other survivors of infant surgery, but I’ve since broadened my idea of who I’d like to reach. Your early situation sounds so hard. It was way before the time of the more people-friendly isolettes where family can reach in through openings and touch the baby. Of course, this situation is not ideal either. Thank you for your comment, Irene. Knowing you and your story gives me courage.

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